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PGA Tour

These golfers are nominated: Election of the “Player of the Year” of the PGA Tour

Today, the PGA Tour announced the contenders for the Jack Nicklaus Award, given to the “Player of the Year,” and the Arnold Palmer Award, given to the “Rookie of the Year.” Three players each were nominated by PGA Tour player directors and Player Advisory Council members. A member vote will be held through Sept. 9: PGA Tour members who have played in at least 15 official FedExCup events during the 2021/22 season are eligible to vote.

Nominated for the PGA Tour’s “Player of the Year” are:

Rory McIlroy

The 33-year-old Northern Irishman competed in 16 tournaments and walked away victorious three times: at The CJ [email protected], the RBC Canadian Open and the TOUR Championship. Rory McIlroy’s victory at the TOUR Championship made him the winner of the FedExCup. He is the first player ever to win the PGA Tour’s season standings three times. He also led the PGA Tour in scoring average (68.670), the lowest on Tour since Tiger Woods in 2009 (68.670). He made 14 cuts and totaled 10 top-10 finishes.

Scottie Scheffler

Scottie Scheffler won a total of four times in 25 tournament appearances, winning the World Cup Phoenix Open, the Arnold Palmer Invitational, the World Golf Championships-Dell Technologies Match Play and the US Masters. He finished the season ranking of the PGA Tour in second place. Overall, the 25-year-old from Texas posted 11 top-10 finishes with a scoring average of 69.293 on 21 made cuts.

Cameron Smith

The third of the bunch, Cameron Smith, is from Australia and is 29 years old. He participated in a total of 18 tournaments and won the Sentry Tournament of Champions, the Players Championship and the Open Championship. Smith finished 20th in the FedExCup with an average score of 69.203, second best on the tour. He missed the cut only three times, while finishing in the top 10 seven times.

These players are eligible for “Rookie of the Year”:

Tom Kim

Tom Kim is a 20-year-old player from South Korea. In his first season on the PGA Tour, he competed in eleven tournaments. He walked away victorious at the Wyndham Championship and placed in the top 10 at two other tournaments (Genesis Scottish Open (3rd) and Rocket Mortgage Classic (7th)). He capped a total of six top-25 finishes and ten mastered cuts with 35th place in the FedExCup.

Sahith Theegala

The 24-year-old Californian competed in 32 tournaments and posted five top-10 finishes, including a T2 at the Travelers Championship and a T3 at the World Cup Phoenix Open. He qualified for the TOUR Championship and finished 28th in the FedExCup. Overall, he collected 11 top-25 finishes and 26 placings to his credit.

Cameron Young

The last player to be selected as Rookie of the Year is 25-year-old Cameron Young. He competed in 25 tournaments and had seven top-10 finishes, including five second-place finishes: Young finished second at the Sanderson Farms Championship, the Genesis Invitational, the Wells Fargo Championship, the Open Championship and the Rocket Mortgage Classic. He tied for 19th in the FedExCup, earning a total of 12 top-25 finishes with 18 made cuts.

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PGA Tour

PGA Tour: Tricky rules situation – Cam Smith penalized shortly before final round

Just before the final round at TPC Southwind, the bitter news reached Cameron Smith. The reigning Champion Golfer of the Year was within striking distance of the lead after three rounds in the first tournament following his British Open triumph, but lost two strokes before the final round on the PGA Tour. So it came down to the tricky scene:

On Moving Day of the FedEx St. Jude Championship, Cameron Smith had sunk his tee shot in the water on the par-3 4th hole. After the subsequent drop, his chip remained just a few centimeters from the hole and the number 2 in the world recorded a bogey. So far, everything seemed normal. The Australian finished his round with 67 strokes and could have attacked the top on Sunday with only two strokes behind. By the way, with a win in Memphis, he would have taken over the top spot in the FedExCup and the world rankings.

Rule violation: Playing from the wrong place

Instead, however, the rules officials noticed a possible violation of the Rules of Golf. The ball had still touched the red line of the side water hazard after said drop when Smith put the ball back in play. In doing so, he violated Rule 14.7 (“Playing from the Wrong Place”) after dropping under Rule 17.1 (“Ball in Penalty Area”). The problem was that after the drop, the ball had rolled back towards the penalty area and just touched the red line.

That officially put the ball back in the penalty zone and it wasn’t dropped appropriately. So Smith should have dropped again; had the ball rolled back into the penalty area, he would have been allowed to put the ball down. The three-time season winner was unaware of the issue and played the ball from the wrong spot, which is penalized with two strikes.

Disagreement among the referees

But why was the Players Champion sanctioned so late? PGA Tour Chief Referee Gary Young explained that the possible rules violation was noticed as early as Saturday during the television broadcast, but was not investigated further because “the camera angles were awkward and he was dropping in a really tight area. We were confident at that point that he was familiar with the rule.” The official on the lap was too far away to assess the situation, he said, and had not been called in by the player. “It was such a quick look that we had at that point that we decided it wasn’t worth pursuing,” Young added. “It’s something the players do every day”.

PGA Tour’s Cam Smith admits unwitting violation

But after the round, he said, they took a closer look at the scene and wanted to make sure there was no violation of the rules. That’s why Young said he spoke to the player about an hour before his start time on the final day. “I thought it was just a situation where I ask Cameron the question and he tells me he’s sure the ball was outside the penalty area,” Young said. “Unfortunately, when I asked him the question, he told me, ‘No, the ball definitely touched the line.’ So at that point, there’s no turning back.” Smith accepted the penalty very calmly and matter-of-factly, he said. “His response to me was, ‘The rules are the rules,'” Young said.

So just before his tee time, Cameron Smith was penalized two strokes back, his score on hole 4 adjusted to a triple bogey. Instead of being two strokes behind, it was four. Whether burdened by this situation or not, the 28-year-old only played an even-par round and fell back to T13 in the final standings.

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PGA Tour

PGA Tour: BMW Championship 2022 with world-class field

This week, the US state of Delaware will host a tournament on the PGA TOUR for the first time – and Wilmington Country Club welcomes an absolute highlight of the golfing calendar for this premiere: the BMW Championship, the penultimate tournament in the FedExCup Playoffs, and four-time “PGA TOUR Tournament of the Year”. Only the top 70 players in the end-of-season standings are eligible to tee off at the BMW Championship, with just 30 of them progressing to the season finale – the TOUR Championship. Professional golf does not get any higher quality or more intense than this.

BMW Championship 2022 with world-class field

This is underlined by the field. Will Zalatoris (USA) tees off as number one in the FedExCup ranking. Patrick Cantlay (USA), Rory McIlroy (NIR) and Justin Thomas (USA) are three former champions looking to regain their crown. They will be joined by major winners Matthew Fitzpatrick (ENG), Cameron Smith (AUS), Jordan Spieth and Collin Morikawa (both USA). The entire top ten in the world rankings will tee off, led by number one Scottie Scheffler (USA).

The tournament week begins on Wednesday 17th August with the traditional BMW Championship Gardner Heidrick Pro-Am, which sees the likes of former basketballer and two-time NBA champion J.R. Smith, former NFL footballer Victor Cruz, and BMW Motorsport works driver Connor De Phillippi (all USA) tee off on the championship course.

All revenues from the sale of Pro-Am places – along with all other proceeds from the BMW Championship – will support the Evans Scholars Foundation, which provides full tuition and housing scholarships for hardworking young caddies. Since the tournament’s inception 16 years ago, The BMW Championship has raised over $40 million for the Evans Scholars Foundation and helped send 3,300 caddies to college. For the upcoming school year, a record 1,100 Evans Scholars will attend 22 leading universities nationwide, including one caddie from Wilmington Country Club.

BMW of North America will contribute a four-year Evans Scholarship, a full tuition and housing grant, in the name of the first PGA TOUR player to record a hole-in-one on any hole during the 2022 BMW Championship. To date, five such Hole-In-One Scholarships have been awarded. It is also worth hitting an ace for the professionals, although it must be on the 15th hole. The first player to hit a hole-in-one on this hole during a tournament round will be rewarded with a fully-electric BMW i7 (combined power consumption, acc. WLTP: 19.6 – 18.4 kWh/100 kM; CO2 emissions: 0 g/km; specifications acc. NEDC: -). As the world’s first thoroughbred luxury limousine with 100% electric drive, the BMW i7 brings innovative driving pleasure to the streets with a range of more than 600 kilometres.

The BMW Group’s transformation towards electromobility will also be visible and perceptible at Wilmington Country Club. At the heart of the BMW exhibition at the course will be the fully-electric BMW iX, BMW i4 and BMW i7 models.

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PGA Tour

PGA Tour: How does the FedExCup work?

In 2007, a new playing system was introduced on the PGA Tour. The so-called FedExCup consists of two components: The more than 40 regular PGA Tour tournaments and the now three additional playoff tournaments at the end of the season, whose field shrinks from tournament to tournament, ending with the Tour Championship and the crowning of the season’s winner. The individual events and the overall victory bring the champions a lot of money – at the end there is even an extra check for 18 million US dollars. Tiger Woods was the first to win the FedExCup in 2007 and, together with Rory McIlroy, is one of the few professionals to have won the series twice.

Points vary depending on the quality of the tournament
A prerequisite for participation in the FedEx Cup is full eligibility to play on the PGA Tour. Players who meet this criterion can accumulate points from the start of the season, earning between 300 and 600 points for the winner, depending on the quality of the tournament in question.

All majors (Masters Tournament, U.S. Open, The Open Championship and PGA Championship) and the Players Championship earn the winner 600 FedEx Cup points. The four tournaments of the World Golf Championship (WGC) are just behind with 550 points. Except for the parallel tournaments to major events, which earn the winner only 300 FedEx Cup points, all other PGA Tour competitions offer 500 FedEx Cup points.

Things get really exciting again in the final playoff tournaments, as the points allocation changes drastically for the season finale. For a victory in one of the three tournaments, the winner will receive a full 2,000 points, i.e. four times the amount of a normal previous tournament.

Points system creates excitement in the finals
The top 125 players after the conclusion of the final regular PGA Tour tournament not only keep their PGA Tour card, but also qualify for the end-of-season playoff tournaments and get to compete in the FedEx St. Jude Championship. As of 2019, there are only three playoff tournaments instead of four. One less event with the same number of points leads to an increase in difficulty, but also less fluctuation in playoff standings. At the St. Jude Championship, 50 players are already eliminated and only the top 70 players are eligible to compete at the BMW Championship.

There is no longer a cut at the BMW Championship, which means that all players finish the 72 holes. This measure adds to the excitement, as the leader is awarded just 2,000 points and is therefore, in theory, catchable by any player in the field. Nevertheless, to be fair, the professionals in the top spots have the best chance of winning overall.

While in the past the points from the FedEx Cup playoffs were set to zero and thus only a strong performance in the finals accounted for a high ranking, there is a point ranking since 2019. This points ranking is generated according to the results from the playoffs. So if you do well in the playoffs, you create a good starting position for the final. The leader of the ranking starts the final with a lead of ten strokes under par, the second place with eight strokes under par. As a result, the third-place finisher starts with a score of -7, the fourth-place finisher at -6 and the fifth-place finisher at -5. Players ranked sixth through tenth start at 4-under par, while 11th through 15th place start at 3-under par. Places 16 to 20 will start at two strokes under par and 21-25 at -1. For places 26-30, the final round will start at even par.

The new Tour Championship mode explained in detail

What does the new rule change?
For ten years, there was a reset of the points scored in the playoffs before the final, after Vijay Singh was already the winner after winning two tournaments. This meant that the following two playoffs no longer had any meaning. Too boring, the officials thought, and introduced the redistribution of points before the final tournament. With the result that hardly anyone still understood the rules. The golf world was not thrilled. Even Tiger Woods once criticized the rule as unfair. After all, consistency over the entire season is no longer rewarded. If a player wins all the tournaments in the season, except for the last playoff, then in case of doubt, someone else collects the Cup.

With the new points system, the FedEx Cup should feel more attainable for all players, especially those in the top 30. Although even this format would have rarely resulted in a different winner in past years from a purely mathematical standpoint, the principle of the final tournament is changing. While some players play better when they are “in the chase” and have to overtake others, many a player plays better when they have to maintain their lead.

“I would feel better about a ten-stroke lead for four days than having to start from 30th place in the FedExCup like everyone else did before,” said Jordan Spieth, the 2015 FedExCup winner.

“The new system still gives a player a chance to finish really high and start a run in a week, but at the same time rewards those who have earned it at the top. I like that every shot counts, but also that some count a little more than others by rewarding a good season,” said 2010 FedEx Champion Jim Furyk.

However, the best performance in the final playoff pays off twice. In each playoff tournament, the lion’s share of the $15 million in total prize money beckons the winner. The overall FedExCup victory earns the champion an additional 18 million US dollars from a total bonus pot of 75 million dollars, the majority of which is paid directly to the players. A smaller portion goes into a “pension fund” that the players cannot dispose of before their 45th birthday.

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PGA Tour

Rory McIlroy after his victory at the RBC Canadian Open

At the weekend, Rory McIlroy defended his title in Canada at the RBC Canadian Open with a fabulous final round. The Northern Irishman had to wait three years for this chance due to corona – and now he used it. With a two-stroke lead, he now holds the Canadian trophy in his hands for the second time. After a few weeks in which he always placed well, but was never enough for the top, McIlroy is particularly pleased about the victory.

McIlroy on the 18th green

You’ve waited probably the longest of anyone in golf history to defend a title, three years. What’s it like to get your name on this trophy with the names like Snead and Palmer and Trevino and Tiger and now for the second time your name?

McIlroy: Yeah, national championships are a big deal. I’m lucky enough to have won a few of them and to get my name on here again with the likes of as you say, so many iconic figures in this game, this is what golf’s about and I’m just, I’m so proud to have my name on there again.

What was this crowd like? What was it like playing in front of these people chanting your name every step of the way, cheering you on from start to finish? Tell us what it felt like from Thursday through to this last putt.

McIlroy: It was absolutely incredible. Thank you. Like from the bottom of my heart, thank you so much. This tournament is absolutely unbelievable. Thank you to the fans, St. George’s, RBC, Golf Canada, the volunteers, everyone that put this event on. I’ll remember this day for a long, long time.

There’s been six people who have won this back-to-back. Nobody’s won this three times in a row. What do you think?

McIlroy: I’m going to give it a go. I’ll be here next year.

Rory McIlroy on his round, the Canadian fans and the US Open next week

We would like to welcome our champion of the 2022 RBC Canadian Open, Rory McIlroy, into the interview room. Rory successful defends a title on the PGA TOUR for the first time, wins on the PGA TOUR for the 21st time, and moves into a tie for 31st on the all-time PGA TOUR wins list. Rory, if we could just get an opening comment on the victory and what it means to you.

McIlroy: And one more than Norman. Yeah, it means an awful lot. I feel like it’s getting tougher and tougher to win on the PGA TOUR. Even, just look at the two guys that I played with today. I went out with a lead and had to shoot 8-under par to get the job done. So the depth of talent on this TOUR is really, really impressive. And going up against guys like JT and Tony and coming out on top, that’s something to feel really good about.

So super happy to get that 21st win, to defend, even though it doesn’t feel like a defense because it’s been so long. And then just to play in a final group like that with that atmosphere all day. I mean the fans here this week have just been absolutely unbelievable. Like so good and so cool to play in an atmosphere like that. Boisterous, loud, but respectful. It was really, really cool.

It was really cool to be a part of and just really happy to get the win today and obviously sets me up well going into next week in Boston. But right now I just want to enjoy this and focus on this.

You mentioned the 8-under par score today. 62 ties the lowest final round score by a winner on TOUR this season. What was the key to the round that, you just kept your foot on the pedal the whole day, how were you able to do that?

McIlroy: Yeah, I think you needed to today. So if you look at the scoring Thursday, Friday, compared to the scoring over the weekend, we had a northerly wind direction Thursday, Friday, which makes the golf course play a little bit tougher. And then we had a southerly wind direction yesterday and today, which definitely makes the golf course play a touch easier.

So I think seeing the forecast last night and seeing that southerly wind again I knew I needed to go out and shoot 5- or 6-under par to have a chance to win.

So, yeah, you needed to keep your foot down, you needed to keep your foot on the pedal. I got off to a faster start today than I have done the previous few days. When you’ve got that little stretch around the tournament, 9, 10, 11, where you can make some birdies and I just kept it going.

I let them in, I let them back in a little bit after I got the 3-shot lead with a couple of missed short ones. But really proud of how I bounced back and birdied those last two holes to get the job done.

You mentioned earlier that this set you up well for Boston. Just wondering, playing a course like this that has some similarities to the Country Club how much confidence can you take into Brookline next week?

McIlroy: Yeah, I mean, I think that it’s not as if I win here and then we’re going to like Erin Hills or somewhere like that where it’s completely different. It’s a similar style of golf, it will probably be a similar setup in some ways. I would imagine the greens next week will be a little firmer if they get the weather they want to.

But overall I thought it was a great week to prepare for the U.S. Open and there’s no better way to prepare yourself for tournament golf than to be in contention, having to hit the shots when you need to. And I proved this week that I can do that and hopefully get myself back into position to have to do that again next week.

You and JT shared an embrace out on the 18th hole right after you won. Curious if you wouldn’t mind revealing what was said and just speak to just how special that was. I know you wanted to beat him but at the end of the day you guys are competing and both really had a great week.

McIlroy: Yeah, so JT is a tough competitor, but he’s also a really, really good friend of mine. And I have probably more respect for him than maybe anyone else out here. Just because we both live in South Florida, we practice so much together, and I see how much, how hard he works at his craft. I appreciate that and I respect that. It’s always cool to be able to go up against the best and come out on top.

And, yeah, we had that embrace on the final green and I just said, Let’s do this all again next week. That’s what I said to him. So that would be cool to be able to do it all over again with him.

Do you consider yourself an honorary Canadian yet and if not what will it take?

McIlroy: (Laughing) Hey, I’ll take it, for sure. The support and the love I’ve got — I’ve only played in Canada twice, in Hamilton and then here. It’s been two pretty good trips.

But, yeah, look, the fans are amazing. They come out and they support this event really well. I think they just really appreciate the fact that we come up here and play in your national championship.

Yeah, if there was some honorary Canadian citizenship bestowed upon me I certainly wouldn’t turn it down. That would be a very proud thing for me. But, no, I’m happy to come up here once every now and again and play some golf and take this trophy south of the border with me.

You mentioned the enthusiasm of the fans. Have you ever seen the crowd rush on to the fairway like they did on 18 there and come right up to the greenside?

McIlroy: Yeah, so I was part of the group in East Lake in Atlanta 2018 when Tiger got his first win coming back, geez, it was his first win in a long time. I’m going to say like five years. I was an afterthought in that group, but I was witness to that. That to this day is one of the coolest things that’s ever happened to me in my career. Today felt sort of similar, maybe not quite the — well it was pretty raucous out there, but it’s really cool. Whenever that happens and you can enjoy your walk and you know you’ve got the tournament sewed up you can take it in and really relish it and enjoy it and it was a cool scene on 18, yeah.

You won so many tournaments, but how much confidence and belief comes about just winning on a Sunday like this and beating two guys, just going into a U.S. Open and for the future?

McIlroy: Yeah, it does, it gives you a lot of confidence to know that, just to see where your game stacks up against the best. JT’s coming off winning his second major at the PGA Championship. He’s won I think 15 times on TOUR. He’s done a lot in the game. Tony as well. Like Tony’s struggled a little bit the last sort of six to 12 months, but he seems to have really turned it around. He had a good finish at Colonial, had another good finish here.

So to go up against guys that are not just the best players in the world but best players in the world playing somewhat near their best and coming out on top, that, it can only give you confidence. So, yeah, and I guess for me, just some of the shots that I hit coming down the stretch, those are things to certainly build on going into the next few weeks.

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PGA Tour

PGA Championship 2022: Moving Day ahead – Southern Hills voices

Halfway through the 2022 PGA Championship is in the books, and already the Southern Hills tournament is once again writing its own little stories. Veteran Bubba Watson played the best round in the tournament so far on Friday, superstar Tiger Woods gifted fans in Tulsa with two more rounds of “Tiger golf” and although Will Zalatoris is playing only his second PGA Championship, his lead isn’t all that surprising. On the evening of the second round, some of the players were still answering questions from the press. We have compiled the voices of the stars.

Bubba Watson: “I was nervous with every shot. I was nervous on every putt. I didn’t have a lead.”

A 63 on the scorecard and still nervous on every stroke? That also only happens with Bubba Watson. The American played by far the best round so far this week on Friday, but he still doesn’t seem to really understand the golf course at Southern Hills, as he admitted in an interview. “I don’t think I’ve learned how to attack the golf course here. If you look closely at my round, I was nervous on every shot. I was nervous on every putt. I didn’t have a lead,” said the two-time major winner. Asked if the strong round was therefore pure luck, Bubba Watson replied in his usual nonchalant manner, “Every round I play is luck. I’ve never had coaching lessons.” – a classic Watson, in fact.

And yet, a round of 63 actually speaks for itself. But Watson doesn’t necessarily believe in his perfect game, or that he understands the course better than others. For the American, the question of victory or defeat is one that is decided between the ears – it’s all about one’s mindset. “Forget about the golf course. It’s about trusting yourself. If you don’t trust yourself, it doesn’t matter if you have the perfect length or the perfect club.”

PGA Championship 2022 – Tiger Woods: “I’ve won tournaments from the cut line.”


It was a big piece of work that Tiger Woods had to do on Friday of the PGA Championship 2022. But the superstar managed a solid round of 69 on the second day of his comeback at Southern Hills, Tiger improved to +3 and now gets to tee off two more times this weekend. Nice for the 15-time Major winner, even nicer for the numerous fans who have carried their superstar since the first hole. In the second Major after his long injury, Tiger makes the cut. Not everyone would have thought he could make such a comeback. And Tiger Woods? After two rounds, he is just happy to be able to play golf at the highest level again. “Coming back here, to a place where I was successful, and playing against the best players in the world, that’s what we all want. Fortunately, somehow I can do that,” Woods said after his round on Friday.

Looking ahead to the weekend, Tiger hasn’t written anything off yet. Especially with Bubba Watson’s performance in mind, Woods believes it’s entirely possible to make up a few more spots this weekend. “There’s a reason you fight hard to make the cut and give yourself a chance this weekend. You just never know when you’re going to get going. I’ve won tournaments from the cut line,” the 46-year-old said. “Hopefully I can play a round tomorrow like Bubba did today.”

Will Zalatoris: “Full focus on everything because we only have four majors a year.”


Will Zalatoris, 25 years young and playing a seventh major ever with the 2022 PGA Championship. But despite his young age, the American already seems to know exactly what matters at a major tournament, as Zalatoris regularly hits top form, especially at the major tournaments. “I think that when it comes to majors, especially since the Masters, I have an attitude that I wanted to enjoy it as much as possible,” the Texas native said. “I don’t want to look back in 20 years and regret my attitude or anything else.”

So far, he should be pleased with himself. After 36 holes, he leads Chilean and PGA Tour rookie Mito Pereira by one stroke. But Zalatoris, who didn’t record a single bogey on his scorecard Friday, also knows he still has a long way to go before he can hold his first major title in his hands. But Zalatoris knows what matters at the 2022 PGA Championship – and at all other majors.

“I have to make sure I’m fully focused in everything I do, because we only have four of these [majors] a year.”

We can look forward to seeing what we can expect as early as today on Moving Day. The top-20 of the leaderboard is packed with world-class players, and each of them will want to take their chance to win the Wanamaker Trophy on Sunday at the PGA Championship.

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PGA Tour

A clear no: PGA Tour prohibits its players from participating in LIV Golf Event

It won’t be long before the LIV Golf Invitational Series kicks off. The first event of the tournament series, created by Greg Norman, is coming up. The first of eight planned tournaments will begin on June 9, 2022. For many months now, there have been heated discussions and wild speculations about the participation or non-participation of PGA Tour players in the Saudi League. Now the PGA Tour made a clear statement.

PGA Tour threatens immense penalties

From the beginning, the relationship between the established golf tours and the new Saudi League was an adversarial one. Some players from the PGA Tour and DP World Tour nevertheless now asked for the tours’ permission to participate in the first event of the Norman Series in London. The feedback from PGA Tour chief executive Jay Monahan was unequivocal: “We have notified those who have applied that their request has been declined in accordance with the PGA Tour tournament regulations. As such, tour members are not authorised to participate in the Saudi Golf League’s London event,” Monahan announced. “As a membership organisation, we believe this decision is in the best interest of the PGA Tour and its players.”

Initially, it looked like the PGA Tour would agree to tournament participation in the Saudi League that would not take place on U.S. soil. Now, however, the PGA Tour qualified that assumption on the grounds that “the event for which they have requested clearance is the first of an eight-event ‘2022 LIV Golf Invitational Series’ season, more than half of which will be held in the United States”.

PGA Tour players found to be in violation could face severe disciplinary action. In addition to suspensions, the punishment could even include revocation of PGA Tour membership.

Greg Norman: “We will not be stopped”

The PGA Tour’s announcement was promptly followed by a response from 67-year-old Greg Norman: “Sadly, the PGA Tour seems intent on denying professional golfers their right to play golf, unless it’s exclusively in a PGA Tour tournament. This is particularly disappointing in light of the Tour’s non-profit status, where its mission is purportedly ‘to promote the common interests of professional tournament golfers.” Norman calls the PGA Tour an “illegal monopoly” whose actions are both anti-golfer, anti-fan and anti-competitive. Undeterred by this latest setback, he says he and his team will not let the PGA Tour stop them.

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PGA Tour

Phil Mickelson signs up for PGA Championship and Saudi opener

The first tournament of the Saudi-backed LIV Golf Invitational Series kicks off in less than a month, and it will feature 15 golfers from the top 100 in the world rankings. This was reported by Sport Illustrated, citing a statement from LIV Golf. Among the 15 players is probably Phil Mickelson, who despite increased criticism in recent months wants to keep open the chance to participate in the first event in London. But that’s not the end of Mickelson’s return to tournament golf. The defending PGA Championship champion would like to start his comeback to the PGA Tour at this very tournament.

Phil Mickelson’s return to the tournament stage

Phil Mickelson is planning his return to the PGA Tour after withdrawing from all upcoming tournament starts for the time being in February as a result of heavy criticism. His proximity to the LIV Golf Invitational Series (formerly the Saudi Golf League) repeatedly brought him into the negative media spotlight last year, but now he wants to make his comeback and will start at the PGA Championship. Mickelson won the second major of the golf season last year. But his start at Southern Hills Country Club is not enough for Mickelson. At the same time, he applied for a permit to play in the first Saudi League tournament in June. A statement from his agency said, “We have also applied on his behalf for clearance to play in the inaugural LIV Golf Invitational in London from June 9-11. This request meets the April 25 deadline set by the PGA Tour to participate in a competitive Tour event.” It is unclear at this time whether he will take advantage of this release, but he wants to keep all options open, the statement added.

15 players from the top 100 will compete in London

According to Sports Illustrated, 14 other players from the top 100 in the world rankings are taking advantage of the 30-day period before the start of the tournament. The names of those players remain non-public and are subject to confidentiality agreements, according to a spokesperson for the LIV Golf Invitational Series. So far, about 70 players have registered for the event, but with a planned field of 48 players, not all professionals will be able to compete. It remains to be seen how and according to which criteria the field of participants will finally be put together. It also remains to be seen how the PGA Tour will handle future Saudi Tour events on American soil. At this point in time, the PGA Tour does not want to issue any permits for participation in these events. This would affect at least two of the eight tournaments, with the tournament in Portland in early July, as well as other events at Trump National Golf Club and the scheduled team finale at Trump National Doral in Miami in late October.

Daly pleads for merger of tours

John Daly sees a simple solution to the eternal back-and-forth between LIV Golf CEO Greg Norman and PGA Tour commissioner Jay Monahan. Daly is calling for the Saudi Tour and the PGA Tour to merge. To him, he says it’s the easy solution and also a great opportunity for golf. “I mean, you want to keep golf going and keep it strong, and the foundation of the European Tour and the foundation of the Asian Tour and the Australian Tour and all the tours and our tour the players have built through a lot of great sponsors that we’ve had. I just think it would be really good if they could work together instead of competing against each other.” He himself has not been offered a starting spot on the new tour, but he likes the concept and sees a great opportunity in the increase in prize money.

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PGA Tour

PGA Tour: Bitter disappointment after unbelievable par

Bizarre moments in the fourth round of the RBC Heritage: Dylan Frittelli’s ball got stuck in a tree at the edge of the fairway on the par-4-6. Literally standing under the ball, he played the ball onto the fairway with his driver and subsequently saved par. On Twitter, Frittelli wrote, “I thought this would be the greatest par of my life.”

Rejoiced too soon

However, Frittelli was hit with a hefty penalty. Two penalty strokes went to the account of the South African. The penalty was based on Rule 10.1c, which provides information on the correct execution of a stroke. Frittelli’s mistake: He stood frontally to his line of play, so that he placed his feet to the left and right of it. “The player must not make a stroke from a stance with a foot deliberately placed on each side of, or with either foot deliberately touching, the line of play or an extension of that line behind the ball. The term line of play in this rule includes only the actual line of play without reasonable distance on either side.”

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PGA Tour

Morgan Hoffmann: Comeback after diagnosis of muscular dystrophy

It’s been five years since Morgan Hoffmann, U.S. professional golfer, was diagnosed with muscular dystrophy. This disease is a genetic defect in which muscle metabolism is impaired, leading to gradual muscle loss. For about three years, Morgan Hoffmann was no longer able to compete on the PGA Tour. His search for alternative cures to combat the previously incurable disease led Hoffmann and his family to Costa Rica. His therapy, he says, included urine therapy, a diet of hundreds of grapes a day, powerful hallucinogens, and lots of meditation and surfing.

As if nothing had happened: Return to the PGA Tour

On April 14, 2022, the time had come: After a break of 923 days, Morgan Hoffmann felt ready to compete again on the PGA Tour. A medical exemption enabled him to regain his Tour card with three starts. His first round was something to behold. He played even par with three birdies and three bogeys: “I felt great. The first tee shot wasn’t as nerve-racking as I thought it would be. I had a great group. It was easy keeping it light out there. We played fast, which was nice. The game didn’t feel anywhere near as bad as I thought it was, so it was pretty exciting.” With a big smile on his face, Hoffmann adds, “It felt like two minutes ago I was out here.”

The only thing Hoffmann is not satisfied with is his drives: “My putting felt great. I’m really confident. Hit all my lines today pretty much. Just a couple of misreads and mis-speed, that were a little slower than what I practiced, I guess. I’m driving it really short. So I’d love to have a little bit more speed.”

Two different worlds

From the jungles of Costa Rica back on the PGA Tour scene – a night and day difference. Morgan Hoffmann seems to like the change: “It was pretty surreal, a lot different than the lifestyle I’ve been living the last 2 1/2 years, and having people cheer your name out there, it’s very special.” Hoffmann also wants to use this media attention to raise awareness about his illness and the natural health and wellness center he is currently building in Costa Rica.

For now, however, Hoffmann’s focus is on the RBC Heritage. With his score of even par after Round 1, he is currently tied for 71st place and has a real chance of making the cut, provided he plays a good round on Day 2.