Categories
Equipment

Drivers for beginners: an overview of the new models for the 2023 season

The beginning of the year means that numerous new club series from the various manufacturers come onto the market. From beginner models to clubs suitable for the professional level, everything from putters to irons to drivers are included. To help you keep track of this amount of products, here’s a summary of five of the new models that hit the market in 2023.

The TaylorMade Stealth 2 HD Driver

The TaylorMade Stealth 2 HD Driver is a new driver model that aims to provide maximum support to golfers. It features a high amount of carbon compared to other materials and is covered with a polyurethane layer called “nanotexture”. This protects the carbon and provides normal spin values. It also has a “Thru-Slot Speed Pocket”, which ensures that deep hits on the face suffer little loss of length. The HD version comes standard on the draw and has weight in the heel and back of the head to prevent slice and provide plenty of forgiveness. The women’s version comes with an even lighter head. Overall, the Stealth 2 HD Driver is designed to make playing off the tee easier by allowing minimal length loss on off-center hits and minimal slice probability.

Adjustable no
Lofts 9°, 10,5° and 12° (RH and LH)
Ladies version yes 10,5° and 12° (only RH)
Price 649,00 €

The Cobra Aerojet Max Driver

Part of the eponymous Aerojet Series, the new Cobra Aerojet Max Driver features an aerodynamic design that allows for increased clubhead speed and ball speed, according to Cobra Golf. The new PWR Bridge Weighting allows for a floating weighting technology with an internal bridge structure. The trajectory is stable and high with a low draw tendency due to the placement of the 12g weight in the back and the 3g weight in the heel. The draw tendency can be increased by swapping the weights. The driver is also available for ladies – in a black satin finish with a shiny carbon crown and sole.

Adjustable yes
Lofts 9°, 10,5° and 12° (RH and LH)
Ladies version yes 10,5° and 12° (RH and LH)
Price 579,00 €

 

The Callaway Paradym X Driver

The Callaway Paradym X Driver is a beginner golf club that contributes to high forgiveness and length through its innovative use of Forged Carbon material. The 360° carbon chassis has saved weight and can be used for more forgiveness and length. The Paradym X Driver is the most forgiving model in the series and is particularly suited to players who prefer or require a draw bias. An external 5g weight in the back of the club increases ball launch and reduces spin for increased carry distance.

Adjustable yes
Lofts 9°, 10,5° and 12° (RH and LH)
Ladies version yes 10,5° and 12° (RH and LH)
Price 649,00 €

The Ping G430 Max Driver

The new Ping G430 Max Driver is part of the new G430 Series and promises more distance while being more forgiving. It is the most fault-tolerant model in the series. All three driver models are equipped with new technologies designed to deliver higher ball speeds, such as the VFT (Variable Face Thickness) face design and the portmanteau of spin and consistency “spinsistency” (for consistent spin). The G430 Max’s flexibility allows it to be used for all levels of play and is particularly highlighted by its combination of distance and forgiveness. Additionally, a custom option is available for players with low swing speeds who can use lighter weights, shafts and grips to create more ball speed.

Adjustable yes
Lofts 9°, 10,5° and 12° (only RH)
Ladies version yes/unisex
Price 625,00 €

The Srixon ZX5 Driver

The Srixon ZX5 Driver is a powerful and customizable driver suitable for golfers of all skill levels. Thanks to the new Rebound Frame technology, the driver has better power transfer at impact and optimized face technology for more distance off the tee. The adjustable hosel makes it easy to adjust loft, while loft options range from 9.5 to 10.5 degrees. It features a sturdy titanium head and weight at the rear of the sole to provide more stability in the swing. With a larger footprint and flattened shape, the driver supports higher swing speeds and straighter tee shots.

Adjustable yes
Lofts 9,5° and 10,5° (only RH)
Ladies version no
Price 599,00 €

 

Categories
Satellite Tours

Saudi International: Abraham Ancer wins by a safe margin

The unofficial LIV Tour opener at the Royal Greens Golf and Country Club in Saudi Arabia comes to an end. Abraham Ancer took an early lead in the field and eventually prevailed by three strokes. In second place is PGA Tour player Cameron Young, followed by Lucas Herbert in third place. Bernd Wiesberger, the only German-speaking player in the field puts a solid tournament behind him and finishes his four rounds in a shared 18th place.

Asian Tour victory: Abraham Ancer celebrates triumph

LIV player Abraham Ancer celebrates an early victory in 2023, beating 70 competitors on the Asian Tour to start his LIV season in top form at the end of February. In his final round, the big point wins were a long time coming, but Ancer collected enough stroke wins in the earlier rounds. After a 64 on the moving day on the par-70 course, he recorded a 68 in the final round to secure the crown.

Bernd Wiesberger in the top 20

Bernd Wiesberger’s tournament finish was a roller coaster ride. The Austrian took an early bogey on the par-3 third. This was followed by two birdies on holes 4 and 5 and thus an intermediate score under par. Shortly before the turn, on the 9th hole, a bogey put another damper on Wiesberger, who went even par on the second nine. After a good start with two birdies on the 10th and 12th hole, Wiesberger played another bogey. His finish was also up and down: with birdie-bogey-bogey-birdie he finished his fourth round at the Saudi International and ended up on T18 with a day score of 1-under-par.

Categories
Panorama

Golf Post Community Award 2023: These destinations are recommended by the community

For golfers, it is obvious to combine the annual vacation with the game of golf and make it a golf trip. Both within and outside Europe, the Golf Post community has already had unforgettable experiences and can make first-class recommendations. The clear favorite, however, is right next door: most of the golf courses that receive an award from the Golf Post Community, as well as all category winners, are located in our neighboring country of Austria. This speaks above all for the strength of the Austrian Golf Post Community, but also for Austria as a sought-after golf travel destination.

Golf Post Community Award 2023: The category winners

The Adamstal Golf Club in the foothills of the Alps in Lower Austria won five stars in the “Landscape” category. With a total of 27 holes, the golf course nestles into the hilly mountain panorama and amazes many a golfer. Streams, terrain steps, forest clearings and rock formations make the course unique and the golfing experience at the Golfclub Adamstal an unforgettable one!

The Golfclub Zillertal Uderns was remembered by most community members for its excellent maintenance. In the category “course condition” the golf course impresses with excellently maintained fairways. At 550 meters above sea level, the flat golf course invites to a sunny playing season from March to November under best conditions.

In the “welcome culture” category, the Murstätten Golf Club in southern Austria came out on top with five out of five stars. Whether golf course, restaurant or golf school – cordiality is written in capital letters at the Golfclub Murstätten, so that the club can call itself the winner in the category “Welcome Culture”. With a total of 27 holes in beautiful natural surroundings, the course is a popular destination that our community will rave about for a long time to come.

The Golf Club am Mondsee was voted top club in the “value for money” category by the Golf Post community. Last year, the golf club already won a community award, and this year it can also call itself the category winner. The Austrian golf course promises a coherent overall package at a fair price. Idyllic location and beautiful ambience at the Mondsee as well as Drachensee meet challenge and vacation flair.

In the last category, the “Gastronomy” category, the winner is the Dolomitengolf Golf Club in East Tyrol. This is also a repeat offender in the history of the Golf Post Community Award. Among other things, the golf club is remembered for its restaurant, which attracts not only golfers but also excursionists and gourmets. The restaurant promises culinary variety from small snacks for in between meals to daily fresh recommendations from the kitchen team.

From golfers for golfers

The Golf Post Community Award was presented for the fifth time this year, and for the first time international golf clubs were also honored. The “jury” here is the Golf Post Community, whose ratings paint an authentic picture of golf facilities in Germany. Golf clubs all over the world can also be rated beyond Germany. Up to five stars can be awarded in each of five categories. A total of 15 facilities outside Germany receive the coveted “Top Golf Club” award thanks to the best ratings. 35 other international clubs with an average rating of at least 4.5 out of 5 stars will receive the award as a recommendation from the community.

The international top golf clubs:

  • Golfclub Dolomitengolf Osttirol (Austria, category winner “gastronomy”)
  • GC Adamstal – Franz Wittmann (Austria, category winner “Landscape”)
  • GC Zillertal Uderns (Austria, category winner “course condition”)
  • Golfclub Murstätten (Austria, Category Winner “Welcome Culture”)
  • GC Achensee (Austria)
  • Club de Golf Alcanada (Spain)
  • GC Reit im Winkl Kössen (Austria)
  • GC Wilder Kaiser Ellmau (Austria)
  • Golf Club Novo Sancti Petri (Spain)
  • Gardagolf Country Club (Italy)
  • Diamond Country Club (Austria)
  • GC Kitzbühel (Austria)
  • Aphrodite Hills Golf (Cyprus)
  • Golfclub Klagenfurt-Seltenheim (Austria)
  • The Montgomery Maxx Royal (Turkey)

More Golf Post community recommendations worldwide:

  • GC am Mondsee (Austria, category winner “value for money”)
  • Gloria Golf Resort Belek (Turkey)
  • Grazer Golfclub Thalersee (Austria)
  • Pula Golf (Spain)
  • Lopesan Meloneras Golf (Spain)
  • Golf Club Crans-sur-Sierre (Switzerland)
  • Golf Club Salzburg Gut Kaltenhausen (Austria)
  • Mieminger Plateau Golf Park (Austria)
  • Monte Rei Golf & Country Club (Portugal)
  • Golf Son Gual (Spain)
  • Golf de Andratx (Spain)
  • Marco Simone Golf & Country Club (Italy)
  • GC Radstadt (Austria)
  • GC Seefeld (Austria)
  • GC Mondsee (Austria)
  • Canyamel Golf (Spain)
  • Franciacorta Golf Club (Italy)
  • Ile aux Cerfs Golf Club (Mauritius)
  • De Texelse Golf Club (Netherlands)
  • Carinthian Golf Club Dellach (Austria)
  • Colony Club Gutenhof (Austria)
  • Golfpark Klopeinersee-Südkärnten (Austria)
  • Praia d’El Rey Golf & Country Club (Portugal)
  • Pine Cliffs Golf & Country Club (Portugal)
  • Robinson Club Nobilis (Turkey)
  • Costa Navarino – The Dunes Course (Greece)
  • Lana Golf Club (Italy)
  • Arzaga Golf Club (Italy)
  • Golf Club Dolomiti (Italy)
  • Golf Club Linz St. Florian (Austria)
  • GC Schwarzsee (Austria)
  • Golfpark Bregenzerwald (Austria)
  • Golf Club Murau Kreischberg (Austria)
  • Arabella Golf Son Quint (Spain)
  • Golf Santa Ponsa I (Spain)

You have already played these golf courses? Then rate them now in the Golf Post Course Finder. Other golfers will benefit from your experience and you can also view tens of thousands of reviews and plan your next golf experience. You can also rate all other golf courses in Europe.

Categories
European Tour

Celebrity Pro-Am opens 2022 BMW PGA Championship

The flagship event on the DP World Tour, the BMW PGA Championship, kicked off on Wednesday with the traditional Celebrity Pro-Am. A host of well-known sport, film and music stars reached for their golf clubs and joined the professionals on the iconic West Course at the Wentworth Club.

When golf stars meet actors, athletes and pop stars

Tyrrell Hatton, the 2020 BMW PGA Champion teed off alongside Formula 1 driver Lando Norris and actor Tom Felton, who played Draco Malfoy in the Harry Potter films. James and Oliver Phelps also rose to fame through these blockbuster films, as Weasley twins Fred and George. They played in the Pro-Am alongside major winner Justin Rose and pop star Niall Horan (formerly of ‘One Direction’ fame).

Another two big names from the music scene, Brian McFadden (formerly of ‘Westlife’) and Keith Duffy (formerly of ‘Boyzone’), teamed up with Max Kieffer. Defending champion Billy Horschel, a self-professed West Ham United fan, took to the course together with Mark Noble, the former captain of the Premier League side.

Other successful sports stars who jumped at the opportunity to play in the BMW PGA Championship Pro-Am included John Terry (football), Jason Roy, Sam Curran, Kevin Pietersen (all cricket), Will Greenwood (rugby), James Guy (swimming), Eve Muirhead and Vicky Drummond (both curling).

The competition of the Morning Starters was won by Tommy Fleetwood, Rahul Yadav, Jayant Nanda and Shirish Saraf with a score of -31. Victory in the afternoon went to the team led by Belgian Thomas Detry (-26).

On Thursday, the focus switches to the battle for one of the most coveted titles on the DP World Tour. Given the high-class field, this ought to be both intensive and exciting. The spectacular top trio of defending champion Billy Horschel (USA), FedExCup winner Rory McIlroy (NIR) and U.S. Open champion Matt Fitzpatrick (ENG) tees off at 08:30 local time. They are followed onto the West Course by Shane Lowry (IRL), Justin Rose and Tommy Fleetwood (both ENG). In Jon Rahm (ESP), Viktor Hovland (NOR) and Tyrell Hatton (ENG), another very attractive group will take to the course at 12:40.

Luke Donald (ENG), the 2023 European Ryde Cup captain, and four Germans – Max Kieffer, Matti Schmid, Hurly Long and Nicolai von Dellingshausen – will also be in action at the 2022 BMW PGA Championship.

(Text: BMW Group)

Categories
PGA Tour

These golfers are nominated: Election of the “Player of the Year” of the PGA Tour

Today, the PGA Tour announced the contenders for the Jack Nicklaus Award, given to the “Player of the Year,” and the Arnold Palmer Award, given to the “Rookie of the Year.” Three players each were nominated by PGA Tour player directors and Player Advisory Council members. A member vote will be held through Sept. 9: PGA Tour members who have played in at least 15 official FedExCup events during the 2021/22 season are eligible to vote.

Nominated for the PGA Tour’s “Player of the Year” are:

Rory McIlroy

The 33-year-old Northern Irishman competed in 16 tournaments and walked away victorious three times: at The CJ [email protected], the RBC Canadian Open and the TOUR Championship. Rory McIlroy’s victory at the TOUR Championship made him the winner of the FedExCup. He is the first player ever to win the PGA Tour’s season standings three times. He also led the PGA Tour in scoring average (68.670), the lowest on Tour since Tiger Woods in 2009 (68.670). He made 14 cuts and totaled 10 top-10 finishes.

Scottie Scheffler

Scottie Scheffler won a total of four times in 25 tournament appearances, winning the World Cup Phoenix Open, the Arnold Palmer Invitational, the World Golf Championships-Dell Technologies Match Play and the US Masters. He finished the season ranking of the PGA Tour in second place. Overall, the 25-year-old from Texas posted 11 top-10 finishes with a scoring average of 69.293 on 21 made cuts.

Cameron Smith

The third of the bunch, Cameron Smith, is from Australia and is 29 years old. He participated in a total of 18 tournaments and won the Sentry Tournament of Champions, the Players Championship and the Open Championship. Smith finished 20th in the FedExCup with an average score of 69.203, second best on the tour. He missed the cut only three times, while finishing in the top 10 seven times.

These players are eligible for “Rookie of the Year”:

Tom Kim

Tom Kim is a 20-year-old player from South Korea. In his first season on the PGA Tour, he competed in eleven tournaments. He walked away victorious at the Wyndham Championship and placed in the top 10 at two other tournaments (Genesis Scottish Open (3rd) and Rocket Mortgage Classic (7th)). He capped a total of six top-25 finishes and ten mastered cuts with 35th place in the FedExCup.

Sahith Theegala

The 24-year-old Californian competed in 32 tournaments and posted five top-10 finishes, including a T2 at the Travelers Championship and a T3 at the World Cup Phoenix Open. He qualified for the TOUR Championship and finished 28th in the FedExCup. Overall, he collected 11 top-25 finishes and 26 placings to his credit.

Cameron Young

The last player to be selected as Rookie of the Year is 25-year-old Cameron Young. He competed in 25 tournaments and had seven top-10 finishes, including five second-place finishes: Young finished second at the Sanderson Farms Championship, the Genesis Invitational, the Wells Fargo Championship, the Open Championship and the Rocket Mortgage Classic. He tied for 19th in the FedExCup, earning a total of 12 top-25 finishes with 18 made cuts.

Categories
Highlights Tours

Farewell from St. Andrews? Crying Woods gets standing ovation

The sporting outcome was to be expected after the first round of the British Open 2022. Tiger Woods fails to make the cut. But he had probably not expected the elemental force with which he was met by the love of the fans as he walked down the final fairway. Riotous cheers from the tee to the green. Standing ovations on the grandstand at the last hole. Even the 46-year-old, who won the British Open here in 2000 and 2005, had to shed a few tears.

“And I don’t know if I’ll be physically able to play another British Open here at St Andrews”. The next Open on the Old Course at St. Andrews is not scheduled for another eight years, in 2030, due to the chaos caused by the Corona pandemic. It’s actually the “Home of Golf’s” turn to host golf’s oldest major tournament every five years.

Tiger Woods: “You could feel the warmth”

That might be too long for Woods, who remains very limited in his walking. And so the walk down the final fairway amounted to a farewell tour. Everyone present seemed aware of the significance of the moment. And even though Woods still talks about wanting to continue working hard to play tournaments, it’s quite possible that this could never again be the case on his self-declared favorite course.

The closer he got to the 18 green, Woods explained, the more emotional it became. He said he saw Rory McIlroy, who had just started on one, coming toward him. “As I walked further along the fairway, I saw Rory right there. He gave me the tip of the cap. It was a pretty cool — the nods I was getting from guys as they were going out and I was coming in, just the respect, that was pretty neat. And from a players’ fraternity level, it’s neat to see that and feel that. And then as I got into the shot — or closer to the green, more into the hole, the ovation got louder and got — you could feel the warmth and you could feel the people from both sides. Felt like the whole tournament was right there.”

And it felt like a very special moment for the spectators, too. Something big was in the air, a big goodbye. At the very least, a big uncertainty. Tiger was probably not the only one who had “a few tears” in his eyes. But Woods made one thing clear right away during the subsequent media talk: “I’m not retiring from the game. I will continue to play British Opens in the future.”

Categories
Highlights Tours

British Open Golf – Decisions in play-off

In the 100-year history of the British Open, only 21 tournaments have been decided in a playoff. While the winner was decided over 36 holes at the beginning, the organizers shortened the playoff to 18 holes in 1970. The last rule change was in 1989, and since then a playoff has been played over four holes.

The Open Tournament Page | News, Leaderboard & Tee Times

Decisions in playoffs – the 2000s

The last playoff took place in 2015, when Zach Johnson defeated his two competitors, South African Louis Oosthuizen and Australian Marc Leishman. Indeed, while Johnson needed a total of 15 strokes (3-3-5-4), Oosthuizen needed 16 (3-4-5-4) and Leishman 18 (5-4-5-4). The deciding factor was Johnson’s birdie on the second extra hole, while Leishman put himself out of the game on the first hole.

Before that, Stewart Cink beat Tom Watson in 2009 by 14 strokes (4-3-4-3), while Watson needed a total of 20 strokes (5-3-7-5) for the four extra holes. In the process, Watson, who was competing in the Open for the first time in 34 years, nearly won the tournament. With a victory, he would have become the oldest winner at the British Open at the age of 59. But his nerves must have let him down. He played a bogey on the 72nd hole, which earned him a playoff against Cink.

Two years earlier, in 2007, Padraig Harrington won with some luck against Sergio Garcia. Harrington had been trailing Garcia by six strokes at the start of the final round. He then took the lead, but played a double bogey on the last hole. Garcia, however, also muffed his putt for the win. In the playoff, Harrington narrowly edged Garcia (16 — 5-3-4-4) by 15 strokes (3-3-4-5).

In 2004, Ernie Els (16 — 4-4-4-4-) lost to Todd Hamilton (15 — 4-4-3-4) in a playoff. Both had previously missed their winning putt on the last hole.

Already two years before, in 2002, Ernie Els had gone into the playoff. Here, however, he prevailed against three other competitors. With 16 strokes (4-3-5-4), he was initially tied with Thomas Levet (4-3-5-4). While Stuart Appleby and Steve Elkington lost out, the two played another extra hole in sudden-death mode. Els edged Levet by four strokes.

The nineties

In 1999, three players went into a playoff for the title. Jean van de Velde actually held a comfortable lead of three strokes at the last hole. But a triple bogey forced him into a playoff against Paul Lawrie and Justin Leonard. After three extra holes Lawrie led by one stroke, another bogey on the fourth hole then made his victory perfect (5-4-3-3). It was the biggest comeback in PGA Tour history. At the start of the final day, Lawrie was still ten shots off the lead.

Marc O’Meara clearly beat Brian Watts (5-4-5-5) by two strokes the year before (4-4-5-4).

Costantino Rocca forced a play-off against John Daly with a spectacular putt in 1995. After he missed a chip on the last hole, he putted through the “Valley of Sin” on the Old Course. The ball rolled over the undulating green, conquered the slope up to the hole and actually fell into the hole. However, Rocca then played a seven (5-4-7-3) on the third playoff hole. This cleared the way for John Daly to win his second major (3-4-4-4).

The Eighties

In 1989, for the first time, only four holes were played in a playoff. Greg Norman erased his seven-stroke deficit with a 64 in the final round. Then he had to wait to see if anyone caught up with him. Mark Calcavecchia and Wayne Grady managed to do so. It was off to the playoff. Greg Norman missed the win on the last extra hole. He played his drive into a bunker, from there into another bunker. After putting his third shot out of bounds behind the green, he picked up the ball (3-3-4-x). Calcavecchia then eventually edged Grady (4-4-4-4 — 16) by three strokes (4-3-3 — 13).

The sixties and seventies

In the final 18-hole playoff, Tom Watson won over Jack Newton in 1975. Watson earned his first of five British Open victories with a 71.

In 1970, Doug Sanders was supposed to win the tournament. But on the last hole, his calf-biting putt missed the target. Jack Nicklaus led by one stroke on the last extra hole and claimed victory.

In 1963, the first left-hander won the British Open. Bob Charles won the final playoff, which was played over 36 holes (69/71) against Phil Rodgers (72/76).

The fifties and forties

Peter Thomson won the British Open for the fourth time in 1958. With a round of 68 and a 71, he edged out Dave Thomas (69/74). It was the fourth of his five British Open successes.

Bobby Locke won the play-off for himself with an emphatic victory in 1949 (67/68). Harry Bradshaw played a 74 and 73.

The thirties, twenties and tens

In 1933, Craig Wood (78/76) lost the first of four playoffs at his majors. Denny Shute defeated him with 75 and 74.

The amateur Roger Wethered didn’t really feel like playing the playoff in 1921. Actually, he was supposed to play in one of his team’s cricket matches. He was persuaded to play, but lost to Jock Hutchison (74/76). Wethered got a penalty, among other things, for stepping on his ball (77/82).

In 1911, the playoff ended after just 34 holes. Arnaud Massy gave up and so Harry Vardon could also break the playoff and won.

The 19th century

Harry Vardon prevented the third consecutive victory of J.H. Taylor (161) with his first win in 1896. He shot 157 to win the first of his six British Open titles.

In 1889, the tournament was held on the nine-hole Musselburgh Links. The play-off therefore went over 36 holes. Willie Park Jr. won by 158 strokes over Andrew Kirkaldy (163).

Bob Ferguson lost his fourth Open title to Willie Fernie in 1883 with a bogey on the par-3 hole.

The first playoff at the British Open took place in 1876. Although it could hardly be called a playoff. David Strath refused to play the playoff. Therefore, Bob Martin only had to walk once from the first hole to the last to be declared the winner.

David Strath refused to play because he disagreed with a decision made by the R&A on the 17th hole in the final round. In fact, the decided to postpone the final decision until after the playoff. If a decision was made against Strath, he would have had to be disqualified. Strath found that nonsensical and simply did not compete.

Categories
Highlights Tours

Historic British Open – The most important events

1860 — Prestwick

Twelve holes are played to determine Allan Robertson’s successor as Scotland’s best golfer. Willie Park wins the championship belt, local hero and course architect Old Tom Morris comes a mere second. The Open Championship is born.

The Open Tournament Page | News, Leaderboard & Tee Times

1870 — Prestwick

Young Tom Morris wins for the third time in a row and gets to keep the belt. On his fourth success in 1872, he goes home without a trophy because the Claret Jug is not yet ready. The year before, the Open was even cancelled altogether for lack of a trophy.

1873 — St. Andrews

Tom Kidd wins the first Open at St. Andrews, held for the first time on an 18-hole course. The Scot is the first to hold the new trophy, but the first name on the base of the Claret Jug is that of the 1872 winner Tom Morris Jr.

1892 — Muirfield

The Open is played over 72 holes (four rounds) for the first time.

1902 — Royal Liverpool

Sandy Herd has the new Haskell ball wrapped around a core sent from the U.S. and beats the established “gutty” guard.

1904 — Royal St. Georges

The Open is held over three days for the next 62 years, with a 36-hole final at the end. J. H. Taylor plays the first round of 68 in golf history on 18 holes.

1909 — Royal Cinque Ports

Business arrives in the form of an exhibition area, with manufacturers and dealers advertising their golf products in tents.

1914 — Prestwick

The great Harry Vardon wins the Open for the sixth time at age 44, making him a record winner.

1922 — Royal St. Georges

Reporters race to nearby Sandwich to radio a sensation to the U.S.: at last, Walter Hagen, the first native-born American, has triumphed.

1924 — Royal Liverpool

Said Hagen, always up for a show, notices a public address by the Lord Mayor as he leaves his hotel in Liverpool. Uninvited, he climbs to the dignitary’s podium to wave to the crowd and be celebrated.

1926 — Royal Lytham & St Annes

For the first time, spectators must pay admission. Ticket-holders watch Bobby Jones’ success, which he sets up with a sensational mashie niblick (8-9 iron) from the fairway bunker over 155 yards of gorse and rough to the green in the final round at 17.

1927 — St. Andrews

Because there was money left over from the previous year, admission is free! Bobby Jones is carried on shoulders from the 18th green by the enthusiastic crowd after his second of three Open triumphs (1930, Grand Slam).

1935 — Muirfield

Coincidences abound: While tennis ace Fred Perry wins Wimbledon, Alf Perry (no relation, nor in-law) wins his only major golf tournament against Hagen and Co.

1950 — Royal Troon

The first German makes a name for himself: Hermann Tissies needs 15 strokes at the 115-yard famous “Postage Stamp” eight. In 1973, 71-year-old Gene Sarazen plays an ace on the par-3, and the next day the inventor of the sand wedge holes out of the bunker for birdie.

1951 — Royal Portrush

The only Open outside England and Scotland is broadcast by the BBC on the radio. Winner Max Faulkner with his penchant for colorful clothing may be considered a predecessor of Fowler, Daly and Co.

1953 — Carnoustie

America’s “Ice Man” Ben Hogan travels across the pond for his only Open Championship and promptly wins the third major title of the season in Carnoustie, thus achieving the “Triple Crown of Golf,” which is still unrivaled today. Only Tiger Woods has ever won three majors in a row, when he won the US Open, the British Open and the PGA Championship in 2000.

1955 — St. Andrews

In the second of his five victories, Australian Peter Thomson is shown live on television.

1966 — Muirfield

The Open is now held Wednesday through Saturday. Jack Nicklaus makes it a career Grand Slam with his first victory, something only Gene Sarazen (1935), Ben Hogan (1953), Gary Player (1965) and Tiger Woods (2000) have achieved besides him.

1969 — Royal Lytham & St Annes

After 17 victories by overseas golfers, Englishman Tony Jacklin restores British Open honors as “Champion Golfer of the Year.”
restores British Open honor.

1975 — Carnoustie

Tom Watson wins the first of his five British Opens in a playoff. In 1977, he engages in the legendary “Duel in the Sun” with Nicklaus at Turnberry. Watson plays the weekend in 65-65, Nicklaus in 65-66.

1978 — St. Andrews

Jack Nicklaus wins his third Open Championship and at the same time completes the career Grand Slam, winning all four majors, for the third time.

1980 — Muirfield

The British Open will now be held from Thursday through Sunday. Seven years after that, at the same location, Nick Faldo is immortalized for 18 pars in the final round on the Claret Jug. Sir Nick also keeps the engraver busy in 1990 and ’92.

1995 — St. Andrews

While John Daly drives the ball onto the green with a terrific shot from the Road Hole bunker on the final round, laying the foundation for his victory, the dreaded sand pit on the 17th green finally brings playoff defeat to his opponent in the playoff, Costantino Rocca. The Italian needs three strokes to break free, but has already written golf history with his 18-meter putt on the 18th green and the subsequent “jubilant ecstasy”.

1999 — Carnoustie

Jean van de Velde makes THE black-out in Open history: Around the Barry Burn on the 18th hole, the Frenchman “gambles away” a three-stroke lead and loses in a play-off against Paul Lawrie. The R&A engraver had already stamped Van de Velde’s name on the Claret Jug.

2000 — St. Andrews

With consistent iron play and without once lying in one of the 112 bunkers, Tiger Woods sets a new scoring record at the Millennium Open (-19) and at the same time makes his career Grand Slam perfect.

2009 — Turnberry

At the scene of the “Duel in the Sun” of 1977, 59-year-old Tom Watson could once again equal Harry Vardon and loses the sixth Open only in a play-off against Stewart Cink.

2010 — St. Andrews

At the 150th anniversary of the Open Championship, the winner is Louis Oosthuizen (South Africa). Rory McIlroy shoots an opening 63 in ideal conditions, prompting the R&A grandees to frantically consider structural changes to make the Old Course more difficult for 2015.

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British Open – “Claret Jug” Victory Award

The trophy that rewards the winner of the British Open Championship is officially known as the “Championship Trophy”, but it is commonly referred to as the “Claret Jug”; it is a Bordeaux decanter. “Claret” is the English name for a dry red wine produced in the famous French wine-growing region of Bordeaux. The British Open trophy is modeled after a silver wine jug in which claret was served in the 19th century.

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Before the Claret Jug there was the Championship belt

But the winner of the British Open did not get the Claret Jug from time immemorial. The first winners were awarded with a championship belt. The first British Open was held in 1860 at Prestwick Golf Club. The first belt was also awarded in that year.

The belt was made of wide, red morocco leather and was trimmed with silver buckles and decorations. This trophy would possibly still be today’s British Open award had it not been for the special achievement of Young Tom Morris: Prestwick Golf Club hosted the first eleven British Opens. Each year the championship belt changed hands as a challenge cup. But Prestwick’s rules stated that the belt would become the property of the golfer who won the British Open three times in a row. Young Tom Morris achieved this feat in 1872, winning in 1868, 1869 and 1870. So he could take home the Championship belt after his third win in 1870.

The British Open briefly had no victory award

Suddenly the British Open had no trophy and Prestwick did not have the funds to commission its own. So club members came up with the idea of sharing a trophy with the Royal & Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews and the Honourable Company of Edinburgh Golfers. Prestwick suggested that the three clubs could take turns hosting the British Open and all contribute something to the new trophy.

While the clubs deliberated, no British Open was held in 1871. Eventually they pooled money for a new trophy.

Tom Kidd 1873 first winner of the Claret Jug

When Young Tom Morris won the British Open again, the trophy had not yet been completed. So in 1873, Tom Kidd was the first British Open winner to win the Claret Jug.

This original trophy has been on display in the clubhouse of the Royal & Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews since 1927, along with the Championship belt (donated by the Morris family in 1908). The trophy currently in circulation is a copy of the original and was first presented to the 1928 winner, Walter Hagen. Each winner is allowed to keep this trophy for one year after his victory, must return it to the next British Open and then receives a replica of the traveling trophy for his own use.

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British Open – Cut Rule

The British Open cut rule is not difficult to understand: The top 70 finishers after 36 holes make the cut. Everyone else doesn’t make the weekend. This cut rule was first used at the 1898 British Open.

British Open: briefly with two cuts

But there wasn’t always this one-cut system. In 1968, the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews (R&A) installed two cuts: one cut after 36 holes, another cut after 54 holes. This cut rule lasted until 1985, during which time the top 80 players advanced after the first cut and the top 60 players advanced after the second.

In 1986, the cut rule at the British Open was changed back to the best 70 after 36 holes. It is still in place today.

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